Health for Journalists

When did you last feel really healthy?

A seminar for people in the media.

No matter what shape you are, you can enjoy good health. Photo: VDuBourdieu©2009

Journalists and photographers often eat on the run. It can play havoc with their health.

In recognition of this, the Freelance Division, CIoJ, will hold an interactive seminar –  ‘Health for Journalists’ – at HO, London, on Friday 11 July.

“As an advisor to Barclays, BMW, pharmaceutical groups and a variety of retail groups, I have built an understanding of the need for relevant fitness training for the professional.”

Personal Trainer, Nutritional Advisor, and Corporate Health Consultant, Chris Field.

Health and fitness expert, Chris Field, will discuss the social implications of health, and the importance of looking after ourselves, during an interactive seminar at CIoJ HO at Surrey Hills on 11 July. He will then open the floor to questions from journalists.

“As an advisor to Barclays, BMW, pharmaceutical groups and a variety of retail groups, I have built an understanding of the need for relevant fitness training for the professional.”

Chris cut his teeth with military applicants, uniformed services and the “lose weight, tone- up” brigade, as well as appearing on television to help those in need of extreme weight loss. He found that the best results were achieved through taking advantage of natural movements and training for life situations.

He says, “Life is stressful enough without having to worry about missing opportunities because you didn’t keep moving.”

As Chris prepared the session, Time Magazine ran a cover story on butter:

Reversing years of negative press on saturated fats, Time Magazine has finally admitted defeat on this issue, reversing course and admitting that the war on fat was wrong. They even expose the junk science that supports this dietary philosophy. (Report: healthimpactnews.com)

Present myths in Vogue about food and health might ensure that – prescriptively – you add skim milk and artificial sweeteners to your coffee or eat margarine with your toast. Pre-cooked meals flavoured with chemicals and corn syrup may also be a part of your day.

Research shows that most common disorders – ranging from bad temper or stomach acidity to diabetes, cancer, and even Alzheimer’s – are linked to what we eat and drink, and how much we exercise. Just standing up at your desk every 15 minutes gives you a break.

Health for Journalists is a one-off event, open to all members of the media, and will last about five hours, starting at 11am on 11 July 2014. There will be a light, healthy lunch for those who attend and a practical hand-out at the end of the day.

Questions: To ensure your questions are covered, you are welcome to send them in advance to: dianec@cioj.co.uk

Venue: The Chartered Institute of Journalists, 2 Dock Offices, Surrey Quays Road, London, SE16 2XU.

Organiser: Vivienne DuBourdieu, Chairman, Freelance Division.

Cost: £35 for CIoJ members, and £50 for non-Institute members.

For programme details and directions, please visit the CIOJ website here.

TO BOOK YOUR PLACE, RING DIANE COOPER ON 020 7252 1187